• Culturally Responsive Professional Learning Opportunities

    This table details professional learning opportunities afforded to Delaware educators. For upcoming opportunities, teachers should visit PDMS and the various Schoology groups managed by the content-specific Coalitions of Delaware and the Delaware Department of Education or contact Curriculum, Instruction, and Professional Development workgroup at 302-735-4180.

    Dates

    Opportunities

    Aug. 15-18, 2022

    7th Grade Economics Model Lesson Training, This four-day training will provide teachers with an overview of the brand new model lessons developed for 7th grade Economics in Delaware. The lessons include culturally responsive and inclusive instructional materials and assessments that are aligned to the Delaware State Social Studies Standards in Economics (Micro, Macro, Systems, and Trade). The lessons are designed specifically to: reflect diverse cultures and voices of marginalized people; include culturally authentic learning experiences; highlight contributions and include texts reflective of the diverse identities of students; and target disciplinary literacy. We will concentrate both on the Economics content and the activities and strategies in the lessons to teach that content to 7th graders.

    Jun. 21-24, 2022

    Democracy Project Summer Institute: Understanding and Teaching Delaware Civics and History Standards for Grade 4, The Delaware Center for Civics Education and the University of Delaware’s Democracy Project will focus this year’s institute on providing support for fourth grade teachers as you transition to Delaware’s civics and history standards and a new state assessment. Benefits include deeper understanding of grade 4 civics and history standards, previews of the emerging recommended model lessons and state assessment, conversations around Black history and culturally responsive education, guided practice in lessons, interactions with government leaders who live the concepts to be taught, field trips to museums in D.C. and Philadelphia, and a $300 stipend. This is an opportunity to gather knowledge that will allow you to plan effectively over the summer for the shifts planned for 2022-2023.

    Jun. 23, 2022

    Using Historical Fiction to Teach U.S. History: A Conversation with Author Laurie Halse Anderson, Using well-researched historical texts can be a very effective way to fill holes in our students’ understanding of U.S. History, as well as our own. This conversation with author Laurie Halse Anderson will explore diverse perspectives and untold stories of enslaved people during the Revolutionary war, drawing on her research for writing "Chains," and the "American Seeds Trilogy." We’ll also discuss why and how teachers should look for opportunities to incorporate historical fiction into their unit planning, focusing on strategies for teaching the American Revolution by including the stories of marginalized groups who had a profound effect on the war. And we’ll provide a list of recommended resources, including many historical fiction texts across historical eras, appropriate for the classroom

    June 2, 2022

    University of Delaware Antiracism Initiative, Asian American Subcommittee Workshop, this four session workshop is offered to all Delaware teachers. Session topics are: Session 1 - Asian Americans in 2022: How did we get here?; Session 2 - Recognizing Implicit Biases in Classrooms; Session 3 - Preventing and Averting Implicit Biases; Session 4 - Online resources for Asian American Antiracism

    Apr. 5, 2022

    Teaching the Holocaust by Inquiry, How can educators guide their students to critically evaluate the history of the Holocaust? Award-winning teacher, Echoes & Reflections advanced seminar graduate, and author of a highly-acclaimed book on this subject Beth Krasemann guided participants on how to approach this question.

    Mar. 10, 2022

    The Rocks & the Underground Railroad or What I did in Pandemic, a Research Odyssey, sponsored by the Delaware Historical Society, Debbie Martin, City of Wilmington Historic Preservation Planner and board member of the Underground Railroad Coalition of Delaware, discussed a new interpretive panel revealing more of Wilmington’s web of Underground Railroad relationships. Using new research and published information, she explored the intricate partnership between three Wilmington men defying laws that kept slavery alive in the 1850s and 1860s: Harry A. Craigg, Jr., a trusted operative of the Black community; Captain James Watson Fountain, a merchant schooner captain of the Chesapeake; and Thomas Garrett.

    Feb. 26, 2022

    Analyzing the Past; Shaping the Future, Middle States Council for the Social Studies, Keynote Speakers: Maud Dahme, Holocaust survivor and author of Chocolate, The Taste of Freedom and Richard Bell, author of Stolen: Five Boys Kidnapped into Slavery and Their Astonishing Odyssey Home

    Feb. 23-24, 2022

    2022 Women in Economics Symposiumfeatured speakers Betsy Stevenson, professor of public policy and economics, University of Michigan; Tisha Emerson, professor of economics, Baylor University; Kristen Broady, policy director, The Hamilton Project, The Brookings Institution; Marie Mora, provost and executive vice chancellor, University of Missouri-St. Louis; Stacey Vanek Smith, host, The Indicator from Planet Money. 

    Jan. 4, 2022

    Culturally Relevant Pedagogy and the Brain, presented by Dean Vesperman, Asst. Professor, University of Wisconsin-River. This session is part of a Teaching for Justice webinar series made possible by the Deconstructing the Reconstruction Era using Primary Sources project funded by the Library of Congress Teaching with Primary Sources Program.

    Dec. 11, 2021 

    Indigenous and Latinx Delawarecollaboration between the Library of Congress, the National Council for History Education (NCHE) and several community groups, including the Delaware Hispanic Commission, La Esperanza, The Lenape and Nanticoke Tribes of Delaware, and the National Park Service; This is series of seven monthly workshops dedicated to learning about the many Indigenous civilizations that populated the Americas before Columbus.

    Additional sessions: Jan. 29, 2022; Feb. 26, 2022; Mar. 26, 2022; Apr. 30, 2022; May 14, 2022; Jun. 18, 2022

    Dec. 6, 2021

    Resources in Delaware to Facilitate Authentic Historical Inquiry, presented by the Delaware Archives and the Delaware Historical Society. This session is part of a Teaching for Justice webinar series made possible by the Deconstructing the Reconstruction Era using Primary Sources project funded by the Library of Congress Teaching with Primary Sources Program.

    Nov. 17, 2021

    Exploring Communities through an Equity Lens webinar, facilitated by the Environmental Systems Research Institute’s (ESRI)education team and racial equity team to learn about the free resources available to help scholars and students apply GIS methods to the study of racial equity.

    Nov. 10, 2021

    Controversial Issues in Social Studies: Educator and Students Rights webinar, co-sponsored by the Delaware Center for Civic Education and the Social Studies Coalition of Delaware. Presenter: Frank D. LoMonte, Professor and Director, The Brecher Center for Freedom of Information, University of Florida College of Journalism and Communications

    Nov. 9 2021

    Reconstruction and Civil Rights, presented by Yohuru Williams, Distinguished University Chair, Professor of History, Founding Director of the Racial Justice Initiative, University of St. Thomas. This session is part of a Teaching for Justice webinar series made possible by the Deconstructing the Reconstruction Era using Primary Sources project funded by the Library of Congress Teaching with Primary Sources Program.

    Nov. 8, 2021

    Clint Smith, author of How the Word is Passed webinar, co-sponsored by the Delaware Center for Civic Education and the Social Studies Coalition of Delaware. The first 50 Delaware educators to register and attend will receive a copy of the book which was one of eight books longlisted for the 2021 National Book Award.

    Oct. 12, 2021

    Using Library of Congress Resources to Teach Justice, presented by Grace Leatherman, Executive Director of the National Council for History Education. This session is part of a Teaching for Justice webinar series made possible by the Deconstructing the Reconstruction Era using Primary Sources project funded by the Library of Congress Teaching with Primary Sources Program.

    Oct. 8, 2021

    Delaware Equity Summit, presenter: Nicol Turner Lee, The Brookings Institute. Nicol Turner Lee discussed the importance of enabling equitable access to technology, harnessing the power of technology to create community change and exploring global and domestic broadband deployment and internet governance issues. 

    Oct. 8, 2021

    Resources for Diversity in Delaware History, presenters: Vertie Lee, Curator of Education for the Delaware Division of Historical & Cultural Affairs; Nena Todd, Site Supervisor of The Old State House; Gloria Henry, Site Supervisor of the John Dickinson Plantation. Description: As museums, when we discuss inclusive history, we are committed to broadening the narrative. We do that by bringing stories to light that have not been told, have been diminished, or erased. For history to be inclusive and diverse, all history must be recognized as our history. In that light, this webinar will highlight different stories, primary sources, and resources used by the Delaware Division of Historical and Cultural Affairs museums.

    Oct. 8, 2021

    Teaching Civil Rights through the Preamble, presenter: Dr. Yohuru Williams. Dr. Williams  is distinguished University Chair and Professor of History and founding Director of the Racial Justice at the University of St. Thomas in St. Paul, MN. He is an acclaimed activist and scholar who is presently finishing a book entitled In the Shadow of the Whipping Post: Lynching, Capital Punishment, and Jim Crow Justice in Delaware, 1865-1965.

    Oct. 8, 2021

    Girl Rising - The Power of Stories in the Social Studies Classroom, presenters Molly Blank and Anne Starkey. Stories are a powerful means to engage students in every stream of social studies. Girl Rising’s videos – which tell the stories of nine unforgettable girls who courageously confront the barriers to their education – and our high-quality standards-aligned instructional resources can be used across multiple social studies courses.

    Oct. 8, 2021

    History UnErased: Contextualizing LGBTQ History for Systematic, Adaptive Change, presenters Debra Fowler, Kathleen Barker, Fatima Al-Muntafik, and Mor Erlich. Description: Join History UnErased as we introduce the what, why, and how to teach LGBTQ-inclusive history with proficiency and confidence. This interactive, multimedia session introduces people, places, and events featured in our primary-source-based Intersections and Connections digital curriculum for K-12 classrooms. We will provide models for engaging students in this content, and share strategies for integrating LGBTQ history into the existing Delaware State Standards for Social Studies.

    Oct. 8, 2021

    Teaching the Holocaust, Empowering Students, Description: How do we create impactful and thoughtful learning of the Holocaust with students? Through our signature professional development program with resources tailored to Delaware educators, Educators enhance their own knowledge about the Holocaust, including the history of antisemitism, and build confidence and capacity to teach this complex subject. This professional learning will meet requirements set forth by House Bill 318.

    Sep. 21, 2021

    Teaching Hard History, presented by Kate Shuster, Research and Evaluation Manager, Center for Anti-Racist Education (CARE). This session is part of a Teaching for Justice webinar series made possible by the Deconstructing the Reconstruction Era using Primary Sources project funded by the Library of Congress Teaching with Primary Sources Program.

    Jun. 10, 2021

    Anti-Asian Violence Amid COVID-19 Pandemic: New Episode in the Long History of Anti-Asian Violence in the United States and Educational Implications. Description: Join the Social Studies Coalition and the University of Delaware's Democracy Project in this webinar presented by Professor Sohyun An of Kennesaw State University. Professor An will share highly engaging visuals and content that will contextualize the upsurge of anti-Asian violence amid the COVID-19 pandemic within the long history of anti-Asian violence in the US, then discuss educational implications to stop the troubling history.

    Apr. 27, 2021

    The Impact of Racial Discrimination on Black American Lives in the Jim Crow Era,  co-sponsored by the University of Delaware’s Democracy Project and the Social Studies Coalition of Delaware. 

    Mar. 31, 2021

    Purple, Mini-Documentary, webinar co-sponsored by the University of Delaware’s Democracy Project and the Social Studies Coalition of Delaware. This is a special screening of the 20 minute mini-documentary "PURPLE" with Melissa Weintraub, the Founding and Co-Executive Director of Resetting the Table and one of the creators of the documentary. PURPLE tells the story of everyday Americans with opposing viewpoints addressing their differences head-on. PURPLE strives to help students engage with and understand divergent opinions on current political and social issues. Ms. Weintraub will offer an experiential walk-through of a suggested post screening process that you can bring back to your classroom. 

    Mar. 17, 2021

    Analyzing Propaganda and Teaching Media Literacy: The Holocaust as a Case Study, hosted by the Anti-Defamation League’s Philadelphia office. Sponsored by the Social Studies Coalition of Delaware.

    Feb. 12, 2021

    The Great Migration and the Economics of Race, virtual teacher workshop sponsored by the University of Delaware’s Center for Economic Education and Entrepreneurship. The session explored the question: what impact have policies devised by our government had on the wealth gap that exists between white and black households? Presented by Brett Burkey, Director of Education, Florida Council on Economic Education.

    Feb. 10, 2021

    Women of Color and the Fight for the Vote,  virtual professional development and collaboration session hosted by the WDNC Educational Foundation. This session’s focus was on how to integrate Black Women’s history across the curriculum - all year. Participants received a free copy of WDNC’s 2021 Women of Color and the Fight to Vote calendar. This session was shared with teachers by the Social Studies Coalition of Delaware.

    Jan. 19, 2021

    Inspiring Young Women to Pursue Economics, sponsored by the St. Louis Federal Reserve, shared with teachers by the University of Delaware’s Center for Economic Education and Entrepreneurship. 

    Jan. 11, 2021

    No More Back Seats - Shifting Black History to the Center of America’s School Curriculum. Sponsored by the Social Studies Coalition of Delaware. The presenter is the 2019 Gilder Lehrman Institute National Teacher of the Year from Washington DC, Alysha Butler-Arnold. Alysha will share lessons and elements of the Black History course that she designed and teaches, and that she presented at this year’s National Council for the Social Studies Conference. 

    Nov. 24, 2020

    Book Author Event - Stolen: Five Free Boys Kidnapped into Slavery and Their Astonishing Odyssey with author Richard Bell sponsored by the Social Studies Coalition of Delaware. A gripping and true story about five young men who were kidnapped in the North and smuggled into slavery in the Deep South—and their daring attempt to escape and bring their captors to justice, reminiscent of Twelve Years a Slave and Never Caught. Their ordeal—an odyssey that takes them from the Philadelphia waterfront to the marshes of Mississippi and then onward still— shines a glaring spotlight on the Reverse Underground Railroad, a black market network of human traffickers who stole away thousands of legally free African Americans from their families in order to fuel slavery’s rapid expansion in the decades before the Civil War.

    Nov. 19, 2020

    Recasting the Vote: How Women of Color Transformed the Suffrage Movement. Author of Recasting the Vote, Dr. Cathleen D. Cahill recounts the actions of a multiracial group who pushed the national suffrage movement toward a more inclusive vision of equal rights, which remains an unfinished struggle that extends into the 21st century. Dr. Cahill will be joined by Jessica Renae Locklear for a conversation about 20th century Philadelphia-area native histories and communities’ issues of concern. Event sponsored by the Delaware Historical Society, shared with teachers by the Social Studies Coalition of Delaware

    Nov. 18, 2020

    How Diverse Perspectives Improve Economics sponsored by the St. Louis Federal Reserve, shared with teachers by the University of Delaware’s Center for Economic Education and Entrepreneurship. 





Last Modified on May 31, 2022